L' action nationale

L' Action nationale, founded in 1933 by economist Esdras Minville as the voice of the Ligue d'Action nationale, is the oldest journal of opinion in Québec. As a continuation of L'Action française (1917-28)

Groulx, Lionel
Groulx kept posing the worrisome question of French and Catholic survival in an urban, industrial, Anglo-Saxon environment (courtesy Library and Archives Canada/C-16657).

Action nationale, L'

L'Action nationale,, founded in 1933 by economist Esdras Minville as the voice of the Ligue d'Action nationale, is the oldest journal of opinion in Québec. As a continuation of L'Action française (1917-28) and L'Action canadienne-française (1928) which represented the "Québec-first" nationalist doctrine of Lionel GROULX, L'Action nationale has always fought for autonomy, against the centralizing thrust of the federal government into fiscal matters (Rowell-Sirois Commission) and culture (Massey Commission). In the 1930s to 1950s it attracted nationalist youth, including editor André LAURENDEAU (1937-42, 1948-54), and in the 1960s progressively radicalized its stand on constitutional matters from one of provincial autonomy to associate-state to outright independence. Directed by Minville and François-Albert Angers, the magazine stressed economics, the continuity of French language and culture, the Catholic church and Laurentian history. It criticized certain reforms of the QUIET REVOLUTION, especially in education. In the 1990s, it embraced a new territorial, civic and secular nationalism. Though it has declined in influence, the magazine has avoided partisan ties and pursues the same objective for which it was founded: free and energetic intellectual effort on behalf of a people and their culture.