Lakeland Provincial Park

A landscape of forests and lakes, Lakeland Provincial Park (established 1992, 147 km2) is located east of LAC LA BICHE about 250 km northeast of Edmonton.

A landscape of forests and lakes, Lakeland Provincial Park (established 1992, 147 km2) is located east of LAC LA BICHE about 250 km northeast of Edmonton.

Natural History
The provincial PARK includes a variety of forest communities. Aspen or aspen, balsam poplar and white spruce stands grow on well-drained uplands; stands of almost pure paper birch occur in a few places. Sandy areas are forested by jack pine with a lichen understory. Black spruce and larch dominate on peatlands in low-lying, poorly drained areas. Thickets of willows and shrubs grow along stream banks and other wet areas. Lakeland, however, is best known for its old-growth forests of balsam fir and white spruce.

This diversity of forest types provides habitats for over 200 species of birds. Birders are attracted by over 20 species of wood warblers (including black-throated green, bay-breasted, cape may and blackburnian) which are dependent on old-growth forest habitats to nest and raise their young. More conspicuous birds such as white PELICAN, double-crested cormorant, bald eagle, osprey, common goldeneye and common loon are frequently sighted.

Forty-three species of mammals have been recorded. Moose, white-tailed deer, black bear, coyote, beaver, red squirrel and snowshoe hare are commonly observed. Uncommon species such as lynx, fisher, river otter, wolf or woodland caribou are occasionally spotted.

Facilities
Jackson, Kinnaird and Blackett lakes are interconnected or separated by short portages and provide opportunities for canoeing and camping in a wildland setting. These and other clear lakes support an excellent sport fishery with walleye, yellow perch and pike being the most sought-after species. Fishing is popular both summer and winter. Although summer access to these lakes is by foot only, snowmobiles are permitted on the lakes for ice fishing.

Over 35 km of groomed trails through a variety of terrain and forests provide excellent cross-country skiing in the Shaw Lake area. These trails are popular with hikers and mountain bikers in the summer. Several trails follow historic routes like the Spencer Lake Trail, which were used during the fur trade. Although there are no developed campgrounds in the provincial park, there are campgrounds in adjacent Lakeland Provincial Recreation Area.