Don Ferguson

 Don Ferguson created many memorable characters in the Royal Canadian Air Farce. Among these are the Confused Philosopher and the famous Colonel Stacy, who fires his chicken cannon at irritating public figures.

Ferguson, Don
Comedian Don Ferguson has created many memorable characters in the Royal Canadian Air Farce (photo courtesy Royal Canadian Air Farce).

Don Ferguson

 Don Ferguson, writer, actor, comedian, producer (born at Montréal 30 May 1946). Don Ferguson received an honours degree in English from Loyola College in Montréal in 1970. It was while working as a photographer that year that he was introduced to future Royal Canadian Air Farce colleague John MORGAN by Roger ABBOTT, an old friend. Ferguson was hired to take publicity photographs of The Jest Society, an improvisational comedy ensemble that was founded by Morgan and his business partner Martin Bronstein and included Abbott as a cast member. It was during this time that he was asked to fill in for a departing cast member. Ferguson became an official member of the Jest Society in 1971 along with Luba GOY. Dave BROADFOOT joined the group when The Jest Society became the Royal Canadian Air Farce and they made their first appearance on CBC radio in 1973. The Air Farce continued to perform on radio and television until 2008, becoming one of the most popular and beloved comedy troupes in Canadian history

 Don Ferguson created many memorable characters in the Royal Canadian Air Farce. Among these are the Confused Philosopher and the famous Colonel Stacy, who fires his chicken cannon at irritating public figures. Ferguson is also known for his irreverent impressions of political leaders such as former prime ministers Pierre Trudeau, Joe Clark, Brian Mulroney and Paul Martin.

Along with Abbott, Ferguson produced Royal Canadian Air Farce for television. The two collaborated on a number of projects, working as co-executive producers on the sitcom XPM (2004), in which Ferguson starred as a former prime minister. They produced three Dave Broadfoot television specials, Old Enough to Say What I Want (1996), Old Dog, New Tricks (1999), First Farewell Tour (2002); a 90-minute 50th anniversary comedy special for CBC television, All Star Comedy Homecoming (2002); and the comedy series Sketchcom (1998). They wrote, produced and starred in three separate shows performed with symphony orchestras across Canada, and are also known for their fundraising efforts. They raised over $3 million for health and arts charities during their radio days and co-hosted the Easter Seals telethon on the CBC for over 20 years.

Don Ferguson has directed documentaries for CBC television and his writing credits include the science fantasy radio series "Johnny Chase, Secret Agent of Space." Among Ferguson's writing for the stage are the political farce Skin Deep and My Dieppe (which explores Canada's involvement in the Second World War).

Don Ferguson has received many awards and honours as a member of Air Farce, including the 2005 Gemini Humanitarian Award, the GOVERNOR GENERAL'S PERFORMING ARTS AWARD, 15 ACTRA awards, a Juno, and a star on Canada's Walk of Fame. In 1993, he was awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree by Brock University in St Catharines, Ont.

Don Ferguson's Air Farce, 40 Years of Flying by the Seat of Our Pants, co-authored with the late Roger Abbott, was published in 2011.


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