Prix Archambault

Prix Archambault. Created in 1940 by Edmond Archambault, president of Ed Archambault Inc, and awarded annually to encourage advanced students in the pursuit of their musical studies.

Prix Archambault

Prix Archambault. Created in 1940 by Edmond Archambault, president of Ed Archambault Inc, and awarded annually to encourage advanced students in the pursuit of their musical studies. The competition was supervised by the MSO's Matinées symphoniques committee until 1943 when its administration was entrusted to Maurice Crépault of the Archambault firm. Crépault remained in charge until 1962, when the competition was terminated.

The competition was limited to piano in the early years but in 1943 a string category was added and in 1944 voice. The winner in each category received an award of $100 and a performance with orchestra in the Matinées symphoniques series. In addition, the prize winners took part in a concert organized by the Archambault company. The competition was open to all Canadian pianists under the age of 22, string players under 24, and singers under 25. A compulsory piece and sight reading tests were added to the performance fare of each category.

Among Prix Archambault winners, Paule-Aimée Bailly (1940), Jacqueline Lavoy (1942), Lise DesRosiers (1943), Jeanne Landry (1945), and Monique Munger (1955) were laureates of the Prix d'Europe as well. The Prix Archambault may be credited with having discovered other young artists who went on to make distinguished careers for themselves, among them Fernande Chiocchio, Marguerite Lavergne, Joseph Rouleau, Sylvia Saurette, Léopold Simoneau, and Ronald Turini. In 1965, the MSO Competition replaced the Prix Archambault.