Louise André

Louise André (born Jeanne Baril), soprano, teacher (born 26 February 1913 in St-Tite, near Trois-Rivières, QC; died 10 April 2001 in Montreal, QC). Louise André devoted her life to the teaching of the vocal arts. She taught at the École Vincent-d’Indy (1935–82) and at the Université de Montréal (1965–83), where she was made a professor emeritus in 1980. She also taught at the Conservatoire de Chicoutimi (1967–72) and at the University of Ottawa (1972–77). André was president of the AMQ from 1984 to 1987. She received the Canadian Music Council Medal in 1985 and the Prix de musique Calixa-Lavallée in 1991.

Louise André (born Jeanne Baril), soprano, teacher (born 26 February 1913 in St-Tite, near Trois-Rivières, QC; died 10 April 2001 in Montreal, QC). Louise André devoted her life to the teaching of the vocal arts. She taught at the École Vincent-d’Indy (1935–82) and at the Université de Montréal (1965–83), where she was made a professor emeritus in 1980. She also taught at the Conservatoire de Chicoutimi (1967–72) and at the University of Ottawa (1972–77). André was president of the AMQ from 1984 to 1987. She received the Canadian Music Council Medal in 1985 and the Prix de musique Calixa-Lavallée in 1991.


Education

Louise André studied piano and singing with Alfred Lamoureux and Rodolphe Plamondon and composition with Claude Champagne, pursuing her musical and academic studies at the Pensionnat Mont-Royal, the École Vincent-d'Indy, and the University of Montreal. At the latter, she earned a B MUS (1938), MA (1940), L MUS (1942) and D MUS (1957). She also received a diploma from the Pius XII Institute of Florence, where she studied with Roberto Lupi (1953–54). Her university studies were centered on the development of the voice. “L'éducation de l'artiste chanteur” was the title of her doctoral thesis. From 1932 to 1967, she was a member of the order of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary under the name Sister Louise-Andrée.

Teaching

In 1980, she began teaching at Laval University, where she created an opera studio later that year. In her teaching, she imparted a sure grasp of various styles through her mastery of five languages and a personal technique resulting from study and experimentation in diverse schools. Her pupils included Claire Grenon-Masella, Christine Harvey, Marie Laferrière, Nicole Lorange, Gloria Richard, Roland Richard and Sylvia Saurette.


Further Reading

  • Angrignon Sirois, Maryse. "Louise André, la doyenne de nos professeurs de chant," Aria, vol l0, Winter 1987