Parfleche

Parfleche is a container made of rawhide that were used by a variety of Plains Indigenous people. The name was given by the voyageurs and fur traders referring to the shape and durability of the untanned skin.

Parflêche
Parflêche was a light rawhide bag used by the Plains Indians for storing pemmican. It was often decorated with quillwork (artwork by Gordon Miller).
Parflêche, Hide
Hide parflêche, circa 1930, southern Alberta, Blood (courtesy Glenbow Museum).

Parfleche

Parfleche is a container made of rawhide that were used by a variety of Plains Indigenous people. The name was given by the voyageurs and fur traders referring to the shape and durability of the untanned skin. Parfleche is a single piece of prepared hide that folds much like an envelope for storage of dried meat (pemmican) and other food. Saddlebags, tubular headdress containers and small pouches for personal belongings were also all made of light, durable rawhide and were often painted or decorated with quillwork.