Guy Favreau

Guy Favreau, lawyer, politician (b at Montréal 20 May 1917; d there 11 July 1967). Favreau was a prominent Montréal lawyer who was elected to the House of Commons in the 1963 election.

Favreau, Guy

Guy Favreau, lawyer, politician (b at Montréal 20 May 1917; d there 11 July 1967). Favreau was a prominent Montréal lawyer who was elected to the House of Commons in the 1963 election. A member of the "new guard" of Québec Liberals, Favreau quickly rose to prominence under Prime Minister Lester PEARSON's patronage. His first appointment on 22 April 1963 was as minister of citizenship and immigration. On 3 February 1964 Pearson appointed Favreau minister of justice and attorney general as well as Liberal house leader. In this period, Favreau carried on the work done by the former Conservative justice minister, E.D. FULTON, in seeking an amending formula for Canada's constitution. The so-called Fulton-Favreau formula was much debated but never approved. In April 1964 Favreau also became Québec Liberal Party leader.

The tasks were too much for him, and press criticism of Favreau intensified as a result of the Lucien RIVARD scandal. The Dorion Commission criticized Favreau's handling of the scandal, and on 29 June 1965 he resigned as justice minister. On 7 July 1965 Pearson, in a controversial move, appointed Favreau president of the Privy Council. His political reputation was tarnished beyond repair. He faded quickly from public view, his health failed, and in 1967 this tragic figure died.


Further Reading

  • Peter C. Newman, The Distemper of Our Times (1968).