HMCS Haida

The HMCS Haida is a “Tribal” Class destroyer that served in the Second World War and the Korean War. It is a National Historic Site operated by Parks Canada and is moored in Hamilton Harbour.



HMCS Haida
The Canadian destroyer sank German torpedo boats, a minesweeper, destroyer and submarine during WWII (courtesy Library and Archives Canada/PA-151742).

The HMCS Haida, a powerful Second World War "Tribal" Class destroyer, was commissioned on 30 August 1943 and built in England for the Royal Canadian Navy. From January 1944 to January 1945 it patrolled the English Channel and the Bay of Biscay, and it was present at the Normandy Invasion on 6 June 1944. The HMCS Haida became famous for participating in the destruction of several German ships. After peacetime service from 1947 to 1950, it received modern armament and from 1952 to 1954 served with United Nations forces in Korea (see Korean War). It remained in service with the Royal Canadian Navy until 11 October 1963. The next year friends and admirers bought it, and in 1970 it was taken over by the Ontario government and moved to Ontario Place, Toronto, as a memorial. More than 30 years later, the HMCS Haida was transferred to Parks Canada. In 2002, it was towed to dry docks on the Welland Canal in St. Catharines for repairs. The following year, it moved to Hamilton and in June 2004, it opened as a National Historic Site. It is moored at Pier 9 in Hamilton Harbour.