New France

France was a colonial power in North America from the early 16th century, the age of European discoveries and fishing expeditions, to the early 19th century, when Napoléon Bonaparte sold Louisiana to the United States. French presence in North America was marked by economic exchanges with Indigenous peoples, but also by conflicts, as the French attempted to control this vast territory. The French colonial enterprise was also spurred by religious motivation as well as the desire to establish an effective colony in the St. Lawrence Valley. From the founding of Québec in 1608 to the ceding of Canada to Britain in 1763, France placed its stamp upon the history of the continent, much of whose lands — including Acadia — lay under its control. Through the use of encyclopedic articles, biographies, exhibits, study guides and searchable timelines, this collection features content related to this history.

New France

Timelines

New France
Exploration

This timeline traces the history of exploration in Canada

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New France
Indigenous Peoples

This timeline chronicles the history of Indigenous peoples in Canada.

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New France
Samuel de Champlain

This timeline chronicles major events in Samuel de Champlain's life.

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Education


Gallery