Browse "Culture"

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Powwows in Canada

Powwows are celebrations that showcase Indigenous music, dances, regalia, food and crafts. Commonly hosted by First Nations communities (either on reserve or in urban settings), powwows are often open to non-Indigenous and Métis and Inuit peoples alike. Contemporary powwows originated on the Great Plains during the late 19th century and, since the 1950s, have been growing in size, number and popularity. Powwows serve an important role in many Indigenous peoples’ lives as a forum to visit family and friends, and to celebrate their cultural heritage, while also serving as a site for cross-cultural sharing with other attendees and participants. Indeed, powwows provide the opportunity for visitors to learn about, and increase their awareness of, traditional and contemporary Indigenous life and culture.

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Video Art

Twentieth-century video art is rooted in 19th-century science. It was the discovery of the cathode ray tube and the electron in 1897 which provided the basis for the electronic reproduction and transmission of images.

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Videodrome

From Cronenberg's original story, Network of Blood, and a screenplay that he continually revised up to the final day of shooting, the film Videodrome meditates on sadomasochism, violence and pleasure in our age.

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Vive la Canadienne

'Vive la Canadienne'. National song most frequently sung in Quebec before 'O Canada' became popular. According to Ernest Gagnon (Chansons populaires du Canada, Quebec City 1865), this old French tune is a variant of 'Par derrièr' chez mon père.

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Voice of Women

Voice of Women, since 1960 a voluntary nonpartisan organization with members in every province of Canada, has opposed violence and war and promoted disarmament and peace.

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Warrendale

The DOCUMENTARY FILMWarrendale (1967) covers seven weeks in a Toronto-area treatment centre occupied by twelve emotionally disturbed children, most of them abandoned by their parents.

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Wavelength

Michael SNOW's Wavelength (1967), Canada's most famous and widely seen EXPERIMENTAL FILM, is a minimalist masterpiece and an important, influential work in the history of cinema.

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Welsh Music in Canada

Immigration of the Welsh to Canada occurred in cycles corresponding to economic depressions in the homeland in the 19th and 20th centuries. Some moved to Canada via the USA and others via the Welsh community established in the Argentine.

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Windigo

A windigo is a supernatural being belonging to the spiritual traditions of Algonquian-speaking First Nations in North America. Windigos are described as powerful monsters that have a desire to kill and eat their victims. In most legends, humans transform into windigos because of their greed or weakness. Various Indigenous traditions consider windigos dangerous because of their thirst for blood and their ability to infect otherwise healthy people or communities with evil. Windigo legends are essentially cautionary tales about isolation and selfishness, and the importance of community.

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Wine Touring

For many years, Canadian wines were made from native grape varieties not capable of producing fine-quality wines.

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Writers' Trust Non-Fiction Prize

The Writers' Trust Non-Fiction Prize, awarded by the Writers' Trust of Canada and established in 1997, recognizes Canadian writers of exceptional talent for the year's best work of literary non-fiction. The current prize value is $25 000 and finalists receive $2500 each.

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Writers' Trust of Canada

The Writers' Trust of Canada was founded in 1976 by five prominent Canadian authors, Margaret Atwood, Pierre Berton, Graeme Gibson, Margaret Laurence, and David Young, to encourage a flourishing writing community in this country.

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Zero Patience

Zero Patience (1993), director/writer/video artist John GREYSON's first theatrical release, is one of his most scathing and strangely hilarious indictments of systematic homophobia.

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À tout prendre

Claude is uncertain. He is a young bourgeois man with a number of accomplishments, but his life has reached an impasse. He begins to question the choices he's made and life's possibilities.

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“O Canada”

“O Canada” is Canada’s national anthem. Originally called “Chant national,” it was written in Québec City by Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier (words in French) and composer Calixa Lavallée (music), and first performed there on 24 June 1880. It began to be sung widely in French Canada at that time and later spread across Canada in various English-language versions, of which the best-known was written by Robert Stanley Weir in 1908. The lyrics of this version were amended several times over the years, with the most recent changes occurring in February 2018; the French lyrics have been shortened but otherwise remain unaltered from the original. “O Canada” was approved as Canada’s national anthem by a Special Joint Committee of the Senate and House of Commons on 15 March 1967. It was officially adopted as Canada’s national anthem under the National Anthem Act on 27 June 1980. The Act was proclaimed by Governor General Edward Schreyer in a public ceremony on Parliament Hill on 1 July 1980.