Women | The Canadian Encyclopedia

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Displaying 1-15 of 84 results
  • Article

    Abigail Becker

    During a vicious storm on 24 Nov 1854, the overloaded schooner Conductor foundered on a nearby sandbar. The captain and crew clung to the frozen rigging all night, not daring to enter the raging surf.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/0a3968ad-ab93-46dd-9551-d90d9206cacf.jpg Abigail Becker
  • Article

    Anahareo

    Anahareo, or Gertrude Philomen Bernard, CM, conservationist, prospector (born 18 June 1906 in Mattawa, ON; died 17 June 1986 in Kamloops, BC). An independent, forceful animal welfare advocate, Anahareo is credited with converting her well-known husband, Grey Owl, into a conservationist.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/new_article_images/Anahareo/pd-393-3-59.jpg Anahareo
  • Article

    Anna Haining Swan

    Anna Haining Swan, giantess (b at Mill Brook, NS 7 Aug 1846; d at Seville, Ohio 5 Aug 1888). In 1862 she joined P.T. Barnum's American Museum in New York, attracted by the monthly salary of $1000 and by the opportunity to further

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/d806cb56-1f79-412d-af67-c3a0ae02651a.jpg Anna Haining Swan
  • Article

    Anna Leonowens

    Anna Harriette Edwards Leonowens (born 6 November 1831 in Ahmadnagar, India; died 19 January 1915 in Montreal, Quebec). Anna Leonowens was an educator, author and lecturer who became famous as the British governess to the wives and children of King Mongkut (Rama IV) of Siam (now Thailand) in the 1860s. After leaving Siam, she emigrated to Canada, where she advocated for women’s suffrage, taught at McGill University and helped found what is now the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. She was the inspiration for Margaret Landon’s historical novel, Anna and the King of Siam (1944), and the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The King and I (1951).

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/AnnaLeonowens/AnnaLeonowens.jpg Anna Leonowens
  • Article

    Anne Brown

    Anne Brown, née Nelson, wife, mother (born 1827 in Edinburgh, Scotland; died 6 May 1906 in Edinburgh).

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  • Article

    Canadian Army Medical Corps Nursing Sisters

    More than 2,800 trained civilian nurses enlisted with the Canadian army during the First World War, becoming the first women in the modern world to hold military commissions as officers. As members of the Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC), the nursing sisters treated and cared for wounded soldiers overseas and at home. At least 58 died from disease or enemy action during the war.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/271eb18d-51cb-46d8-b660-42a54e9557c5.jpg Canadian Army Medical Corps Nursing Sisters
  • Article

    Catharine Parr Traill

    Catharine Parr Traill, née Strickland, pioneer writer, botanist (born 9 January 1802 in London, England; died 29 August 1899 in Lakefield, ON). Catharine Parr Traill’s books are some of the earliest in the Canadian literary canon. Works such as The Backwoods of Canada: Being Letters from the Wife of an Emigrant Officer (1836) offer detailed descriptions of pioneer life in Canada, while Canadian Wildflowers (1868) and Studies of Plant Life in Canada (1885) showcase her skill as an amateur botanist.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/!feature-img-thumbnails/Catharine-Traill-tweet.jpg Catharine Parr Traill
  • Article

    Catherine (HRH The Princess of Wales)

    Her Royal Highness (HRH) The Princess of Wales, née Catherine “Kate” Middleton (born 9 January 1982 in Reading, United Kingdom) is the wife of HRH The Prince of Wales (The Prince William) , who is first in line to the thrones of Canada, the United Kingdom and 14 other Commonwealth realms. Kate has become famous worldwide for her philanthropy and fashion, and is closely associated with the modernization of the monarchy. William and Kate have three children: Prince George of Wales (born 22 July 2013), Princess Charlotte of Wales (born 2 May 2015), and Prince Louis of Wales (born 23 April 2018).

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  • Article

    Catherine Schubert

    Catherine Schubert (born 23 April 1835 in Rathfriland, County Down, Ireland; died 18 July 1918 in Armstrong, British Columbia). Catherine Schubert was the only female member of the 1862 Overlanders, a group of some 150 settlers who travelled from Fort Garry (now Winnipeg, Manitoba) to the interior of British Columbia, following the Cariboo Gold Rush.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/new_article_images/CatherineSchubert/Catherine_Schubert.jpg Catherine Schubert
  • Article

    Cecelia Jane Reynolds

    Cecelia Jane Reynolds, freedom seeker (born c. May 1831 in Virginia; died 4 June 1909 in Louisville, Kentucky). In May 1846, Cecelia fled her Kentucky enslavers by way of Niagara Falls and the Underground Railroad. Letters between Cecelia and Fanny Thruston, the Louisville belle to whom she had been a personal servant, have become unique primary sources for historians studying enslavement and relations between the formerly enslaved and American slaveholders.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/TCE_placeholder.png Cecelia Jane Reynolds
  • Article

    Chloe Cooley

    Chloe Cooley was one of hundreds of Black women enslaved in the French and British colonies that became Canada. Although little is known about Chloe Cooley, who was enslaved in Upper Canada, her struggles against her enslaver, Sergeant Adam Vrooman, precipitated the Act to Limit Slavery in Upper Canada of 1793. The Act was the first legislation in the British colonies to restrict the slave trade. (See also Black Enslavement in Canada.) Click here for definitions of key terms used in this article.

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  • Article

    Clara Brett Martin

    Martin finally achieved her goal on 2 February 1897, becoming the first woman lawyer in the British Empire. She went on to earn Bachelor of Civil Law (1897) and LLB (1899) degrees and to establish a successful Toronto practice.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/9fc740ed-105c-401a-a70b-bd77c8f53390.jpg Clara Brett Martin
  • Editorial

    Clara Brett Martin: Hero or Villain?

    The following article is an editorial written by The Canadian Encyclopedia staff. Editorials are not usually updated. "This application to the Law Society of Upper Canada is refused. The governing statute regulating this body, not having been drafted under the advanced views of the day and specifically referring to the admission of persons, does not permit the interpretation of 'persons' to include women. This was the spirit of the reply to Clara Brett Martin's application to study law in 1891.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Clara Brett Martin: Hero or Villain?
  • Article

    Demasduit

    Demasduit (also known as Demasduwit, Shendoreth, Waunathoake, and Mary March), creator of a Beothuk dictionary (born 1796; died 8 January 1820 at Bay of Exploits, Newfoundland). Demasduit was a Beothuk woman taken captive by English fishers in 1819. She was subsequently sent to an Anglican missionary where she created a list of Beothuk vocabulary. After her death, her remains and those of her husband were taken to Scotland. After much lobbying, the remains were returned to Newfoundland in 2020. The Government of Canada has recognized Demasduit as a Person of National Historic Significance.

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  • Article

    Dionne Quintuplets

    Annette, Emilie, Yvonne, Cecile and Marie aroused worldwide attention after their birth at Corbeil, Ontario, to Oliva and Elzire Dionne on 28 May 1934. With only two previous cases on record, they were the only quintuplets to survive for more than a few days. This miracle, plus their baby cuteness, the poverty of their French Canadian parents, and the controversy over their guardianship, made them the sensation of the 1930s.

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