Browse "Industry"

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Brewing Industry in Canada

Brewing in Canada evolved from a household necessity into a commercial industry that, while short lived in New France, grew rapidly under British rule. From its regional roots to national consolidation and the rise of the craft beer movement, the brewing industry has both shaped and adapted to Canadians’ tastes. Aside from a brief period of Prohibition, it has also been a large, stable source of tax income for governments. In 2016, beer accounted for roughly $13.6 billion of Canada’s gross domestic product, or 0.7 per cent of the economy. The industry employs nearly 149,000 people, or 0.8 per cent of Canadian workers.

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Craft Brewing in Canada

​Prior to the First World War, Canada boasted 117 independent breweries. But by the early 1980s, just 10 brewing companies remained in Canada — and the three largest, Molson, Labatt and Carling O’Keefe — owned 96 per cent of the market.

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Bricklin

American promoter Malcolm Bricklin wanted to build his own US-designed sports car, and, lured by loan guarantees of $2 880 000 plus $500 000 for 51% of the stock, he set up shop in Saint John and Minto, NB, where the fibreglass bodies were made.

Macleans

Bronfman Versus Hollywood

Montreal's Bronfman family is no stranger to controversy. After arriving in Canada from Russia in the 1890s, they made a fortune outrunning federal tax collectors and selling whisky to American mobsters. The next generation made headlines tussling over control of the family firm, Seagram Co. Ltd.

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Bronfman Sells DuPont

Former film-maker Edgar Bronfman Jr. showed last week that he still has a flair for the dramatic. Investors and analysts were kept on the edge of their seats as the 39-year-old chief executive of Seagram Co. Ltd.

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Business Elites

The role of business elites has never been as straightforward in Canadian society as it has in countries with longer histories and more clearly defined class systems.

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Canadian Business

Canadian Business, a magazine established in 1927, is Canada's leading business monthly magazine. It was owned by the Montréal Chamber of Commerce and published in Montréal from its inception until 1978, when it was bought by Michael de Pencier, Alexander Ross and Roy MacLaren, and moved to Toronto.

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Canadian Business Review

Canadian Business Review, The, established in 1974, was a quarterly published by the Conference Board of Canada from its headquarters in Ottawa. With a circulation of about 8000, it fulfilled the same role in Canada as the board's US magazine, Across the Board, did in that country.

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Merrill Lynch Buys Midland Walwyn

How's this for a long-range forecast? In 1989-1990, when a mid-sized Canadian investment brokerage called Midland Doherty Financial Corp. was running on empty, management did the rounds of all the big banks and fund managers in an attempt to sell enough cheap equity to keep the firm going.

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Rogers Buys Vidéotron

On Bay Street they call him the king of cable, but Ted Rogers' ambitions have always extended far beyond the television set. For years, the founder and chief executive officer of Rogers Communications Inc.

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Seagrams Buys MCA

Last week, as investors tried to get used to the idea of Seagram Co. Ltd. as a show-biz giant, America’s newest movie mogul was in California. Edgar Bronfman Jr. was visiting the institution that redefined his company: the huge entertainment conglomerate MCA Inc.

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Caisse populaire

 The caisse populaire was established in 1900 as a co-operative savings and loan company with nonfixed capital and limited liability in Lévis, Québec, by Alphonse DESJARDINS, a journalist and French-language stenographer in the House of Commons.

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Calgary Herald

Calgary Herald, newspaper, was first published by Andrew Armour and Thomas Braden on 31 Aug 1883 as the Calgary Herald, Mining and Ranche Advocate and General Advertiser.

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Roots Canada

The press clippings are piled three inches high on a table in Michael Budman's Toronto office. The co-owner of Roots Canada Ltd. strides into the sunny room, stops to survey the pile, plucks out a picture that features Prince William wearing the red Roots Olympic hat.

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DaimlerChrysler Canada Inc.

DaimlerChrysler Canada Inc., formerly Chrysler Canada Ltd, with its head office in WINDSOR, Ontario, is a major manufacturer and distributor of cars and trucks in Canada. The company manufactures cars and minivans for Canadian, US and export markets.

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VIA Rail Canada Inc.

In 1981 VIA cancelled or reduced numerous routes in an attempt to make passenger service more efficient. Services in parts of the country were seriously affected and the Liberal government was widely criticized. A nonconfidence vote over the issue in October 1981 was won by the government.

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Manufacturing in Canada

Manufacturing is a critical component of Canada’s economy. The production, sale and distribution of finished products contribute to consumer and labour markets, and secure Canada’s position as an economic leader among developed nations. Major, medium-sized and small manufacturers produce goods used by Canadians and contribute to the revenue gained from the export of goods to other countries. Since the early 2000s, the manufacturing sector in Canada has declined significantly in response to changes in the global economy and fewer regulatory controls over Canadian products (see Free Trade; Globalization). The composition and structure of the Canadian manufacturing industry is transitioning in response to these changes, aiming to produce new goods that are in greater demand.