Browse "Geographical features"

Displaying 281-300 of 450 results
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Mount St Elias

Mount St Elias, elev 5489 m, the second-highest mountain in Canada, a boundary peak between Alaska and the YT, is located in the St Elias Range, 43 km SW of Mt LOGAN.

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Mount Steele

Mount Steele, elevation 5067 m, is located among Canada's highest mountains in the St Elias Range of Yukon.

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Mount Vancouver

Mount Vancouver, elevation 4785 m, situated in the Yukon Territory's St Elias Mountains, rises southeast of Mount Logan between 2 immense glacier systems, Hubbard and Seward.

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Mount Waddington

Mount Waddington, elev 4016 m, the highest mountain in BC's Coast Mountains, rises near the head of Knight Inlet, 282 km NW of Vancouver.

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Mountain Range

Mountain ranges generally belong to the same geological structure, and consist of a series of peaks and ridges surrounded by lowlands and valleys. There are many mountain ranges in Canada, including the Rocky Mountains, the St. Elias Mountains and the Laurentian Mountains.

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Mountains

Mountains. As an inspiration for Canadian music, mountains have enjoyed limited popularity. Not unexpectedly the mountains most often referred to are the Rockies of Alberta and British Columbia.

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Muskeg

Muskeg (from Cree maskek and Ojibwe mashkiig, meaning “grassy bog”) is a type of northern landscape characterized by a wet environment, vegetation and peat deposits. Chiefly used in North America, the term muskeg escapes precise scientific definition. It encompasses various types of wetlands found in the boreal zone, including bogs, fens, swamps and mires. In Canada, muskeg and other peatlands cover up to 1.2 million km2, or 12 per cent of the country’s surface.

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Nagwichoonjik Cultural Landscape

Nagwichoonjik, meaning "river flowing through a big country," is the Gwich'in name for the Mackenzie River, the longest river in Canada and the 9th longest river in the world. The river flows through the heart of the traditional homeland of the Gwichya Gwich'in, who now largely reside in  Tsiigehtchic (formerly Arctic Red River), a small community of 200 people at the confluence of the Arctic Red and Mackenzie rivers, in the northern part of the Northwest Territories. ( See also Indigenous Territory).

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Napaktulik Lake

Napaktulik Lake, 1080 km2, elevation 381 m, maximum length 60 km, is located in Nunavut almost on the Arctic Circle, 173 km south of Kugluktuk, NWT. The lake is fed by a tributary of the COPPERMINE RIVER and drains northeast to BATHURST INLET via the Hood River.

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Nass River

Nass River is 380 km long, rises in the northern interior of BC and flows generally southwest, draining approximately 20 700 km2, to reach the Pacific at Portland Inlet. Its major tributaries are the Bell-Irving, Meziadin and Cranberry rivers.

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Navy Island

Navy Island is the only Canadian island in the Niagara River. The 127.9 ha island is named after a British shipyard (1793) where the first naval vessels to sail the Upper Great Lakes were constructed.

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Nechako River

The Nechako River rises in the Coast Mountains in west-central BC and flows east to form a principal tributary of the Fraser River. Because of massive damming of its headwaters, it is no longer possible to give its length or tell exactly where it used to rise.

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Nelson River

The Nelson River, 2,575 km long, flows north northeast out of Playgreen Lake, at the northwest tip of Lake Winnipeg. It spills out into a number of lakes, including Cross, Sipiwesk, Split and Stevens, flowing east from the latter into Hudson Bay.

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Nettilling Lake

Nettilling Lake, 5542 km2, elevation 30 m, max length 123 km, is located toward the south end of Baffin Island in the Great Plain of the Koukdjuak, about 110 km southwest of Auyuittuq National Park and 280 km northwest of Iqaluit. The name is of Inuktitut origin but its meaning is unclear.

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New Caledonia

 New Caledonia ("New Scotland"), was a name given in 1806 to the central and highland plateau area of BRITISH COLUMBIA by Simon FRASER, a partner, trader and explorer in the NORTH WEST CO.

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Niagara Falls (Waterfalls)

 The falls have eroded the soft shales and limestones of the escarpment at an average rate of 1.2 m per year and now stand 11 km from their place of origin at present-day QUEENSTON. Their recession rate has been variable though, as the volume of water flowing from the upper Great Lakes controls it.

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Niagara River

The Niagara River, 58 km long, issues from Lake Erie and flows north over Niagara Falls to Lake Ontario. The river’s drainage area is about 684,000 km2, and its average flow at Queenston is 5,885 m3/s. The Niagara River forms part of the border between Canada and the United States.

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North

In strictly geographic terms, the North refers to the immense hinterland of Canada that lies beyond the narrow strip of the country in which most Canadians live and work, but generally refers to the Northwest Territories, the Yukon and Nunavut.