Browse "Geographical features"

Displaying 361-380 of 451 results
Article

Rivière Nottaway

Rivière Nottaway, 776 km (via Rivière Bell to head of Rivière Mégiscane), rises in west-central Québec and flows north via Lacs Parent and Quévillon into Lac Matagami. Here it is joined by its chief headstream, Rivière Waswanipi, and then drains northwest through Lac Soscumica.

Article

Rivière Richelieu

The Richelieu River has played a prominent role in the historical development of Québec. Originally inhabited by Iroquois, Huron and Algonquin, Samuel de CHAMPLAIN navigated its waters shortly after his arrival in 1608.

Article

Rivière Romaine

Rivière Romaine, 496 km long with a 14 350 km2 basin, rises (elev 760 m) in the Québec-Labrador lacustrine plateau, 45 km southwest of the CHURCHILL RIVER, and forms part of the Québec-Labrador boundary north of the 52nd parallel.

Article

Rivière Saint-Maurice

Rivière Saint-Maurice, 563 km long, rises upstream from Réservoir Gouin, 200 km west of Lac Saint-Jean, Québec. It drains a basin of 43 300 km2. After its confluence with Rivière Manouane, it feeds Réservoir Blanc and then takes in the Vermillon, Trenche, Croche, Mattawin and Mékinac rivers.

Article

Rocky Mountain Trench

The Rocky Mountain Trench is a long and deep valley extending approximately 1,500 km from the Bitterroot Valley in northwest Montana through British Columbia to the Liard Plain just south of the Yukon Territory. Its predominantly flat floor is 3–20 km wide and ranges in elevation between 600 m and 1,000 m above sea level. With walls made of sedimentary, volcanic and igneous rock, the Trench is sometimes referred to as the “Valley of a Thousand Peaks” because of the towering mountain ranges on either side: the Rocky Mountains to the east and the Columbia, Omineca and Cassiar mountains to the west. Humans have relied on the rich resources provided by this distinctive landscape from pre-colonial times to the present.

Article

Rocky Mountains

Castlelike mountain resorts built on the rail line at Banff and Lake Louise have become all-season recreation centres for Banff National Park's (established 1885) many alpine attractions, which attract 4.5 million visitors annually.

Article

Rupert's Land

Rupert’s Land was a vast territory of northern wilderness. It represented a third of what is now Canada. From 1670 to 1870, it was the exclusive commercial domain of the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) and the primary trapping grounds of the fur trade. The territory was named after Prince Rupert, the HBC’s first governor. Three years after Confederation, the Government of Canada acquired Rupert’s Land from the HBC for $1.5-million. It is the largest real estate transaction (by land area) in the country’s history. The purchase of Rupert’s Land transformed Canada geographically. It changed from a modest country in the northeast of the continent into an expansive one that reached across North America. Rupert’s Land was eventually divided among Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territories.

Article

Saanich Peninsula

Saanich Peninsula, BC, forms part of the Nanaimo Lowlands, along Vancouver Island's east coast. It extends from Sidney in the north to Victoria in the south, and is 33 km long and averages 4 km in width; 90 per cent of its perimeter is fronted by sea. The dominant geographical features are Mount Newton and Saanich Inlet.

Article

Sable Island

Shaped like an open crescent, 35 km long and 1.6 km wide at its widest point, it narrows at both ends to West and East Spits, which continue offshore as shallow submerged bars.

Article

Saint John River

Saint John River, 673 km long, rises in northern Maine and flows northeast into the forests of Madawaska County to Edmundston, where it is joined by the Madawaska River and turns southeast, forming much of the border between Maine and New Brunswick.

Article

Salish Sea

The Salish Sea, approximately 18 000 km2, is comprised of the inland marine waters of Juan de Fuca Strait, the Strait of Georgia and Puget Sound, as well as their connecting channels, passes and straits.

Article

Saltspring Island

Saltspring Island, BC, 182 km2 is the largest of the Gulf Islands, a group lying in the Strait of Georgia off the southeastern corner of Vancouver Island.

Article

Saskatchewan River

The Saskatchewan River is 1,939 km long from the Rocky Mountains headwaters to Cedar Lake in central Manitoba. When including its longest tributary, the South Saskatchewan River, the Saskatchewan River is the fourth-longest river in Canada. It’s a major tributary to the Nelson River, ultimately draining into Hudson Bay. Its name is derived from the Cree word kisiskâciwanisîpiy meaning swift-flowing river. The Saskatchewan River was a major transportation route for First Nations for thousands of years and was an instrumental transportation and resource corridor during the fur trade and early European exploration.

Article

Seal River

Named for the harbour seals (normally marine creatures) that are found up to 200 km upstream from Hudson Bay, Manitoba's Seal River is formed by the confluence of the North Seal (about 200 km long) and the South Seal (about 240 km long) rivers at Shethanei Lake.

Article

Sechelt Peninsula

The Sechelt Peninsula, approximately 350 km2, is part of a popular cottage area and yachting centre in British Columbia known as the "Sunshine Coast." Isolated from nearby Vancouver, BC, by Howe Sound and the Coast Mountains, its coast is linked by ferries with Vancouver via Horseshoe Bay and with Powell River via Saltery Bay.

Article

Selwyn Mountains

The northern Selwyn Mountains lie to the east of the Yukon-NWT border, and the southern section straddles the border south from the Macmillan Pass to the South Nahanni River.