Browse "Coastal Regions"

Article

St Mary's Bay

St Mary's Bay, on the south coast of Newfoundland's Avalon Peninsula between Placentia Bay and Trepassey Bay, runs 65 km northeast to Colinet Harbour from its mouth between St Shotts and Point Lance, 32 km northwest.

Article

Trinity Bay

Trinity Bay, reputedly named by Gaspar CORTE-REAL on Trinity Sunday, in 1500, is entered between Grates Pt on the N side of Newfoundland's AVALON PENINSULA and the N tip of the Bonavista Pen, 60 km NW, which forms the bay's western shore.

Article

Bay d'Espoir

Bay d'Espoir is a fjordlike arm of Hermitage Bay on Newfoundland's south coast, entered between West Head and Dawson Point, 3 km northwest. More than 50 km from mouth to head, ice-free Bay d'Espoir (French for "hope") has sheer cliffs and steep-sided hills rising 180 to 300 m.

Article

Chignecto Bay

Chignecto Bay, northeastern arm of the Bay of Fundy. The name comes from the Indigenous word sigunikt, usually said to mean "foot cloth," perhaps from a Mi'kmaq legend. The area around present-day Sackville, NB, was first settled by Acadians in 1671 and by Yorkshire Methodists about 100 years later.

Article

Placentia Bay

Placentia Bay, from the French plaisance (meaning a "pleasant place"), is a large, deep bay formed by Newfoundland's Burin Peninsula to the west, and the southwestern Avalon Peninsula to the east.

Article

Bellot Strait

Bellot Strait, at 71° 58´ N, separates Somerset Island from the Boothia Peninsula, marking the northernmost point on the mainland of North America.

Article

Beringia

The importance of Beringia is twofold: it provided a pathway for intercontinental exchanges of plants and animals during glacial periods and for interoceanic exchanges during interglacials; it has been a centre of evolution and has supported apparently unique plant and animal communities.

Article

Cape Blomidon

Cape Blomidon lies along the southeast shore of the Bay of Fundy at the mouth of Minas Basin, the site of some of the world's highest tides.

Article

Gulf of Boothia

The Gulf of Boothia is entered through Prince Regent Inlet. To the east it is bounded by the northwest coast of BAFFIN ISLAND, and to the west by the BOOTHIA PENINSULA. Depths are generally about 275 m, decreasing southward.

Article

Cabot Strait

Cabot Strait, the passage between southwest Newfoundland and Cape Breton Island. Named for explorer John Cabot, it is 110 km wide between Cape Ray, Nfld, and Cape North, NS.

Article

Strait of Canso

Strait of Canso of, 27 km long, 3 km wide, 60 m deep, is a deep, narrow channel separating the Nova Scotian mainland and Cape Breton Island.

Article

Cape Kildare

Cape Kildare extends eastward into the Gulf of St Lawrence at the northern end of Prince Edward Island. Named by Samuel Holland in 1765 after James, 20th earl of Kildare, it is part of a series of capes in the area known as the Kildare Capes.

Article

Cape Race

Cape Race, elevation 30-40 m, is the southeastern extremity of Newfoundland's AVALON PENINSULA. Named for its flat-topped (Portuguese, raso) cliffs, it has a barren appearance that creates a stark impression for transatlantic

Article

Cape Spear

Cape Spear, elev 75 m, most easterly point in N America (excluding Greenland), is located 6.7 km SE of the entrance to St John's harbour, Nfld. A rocky, windswept promontory of Precambrian formation, with a thin, sporadic cover

Article

North Cape

North Cape, also called North Port, is the northern extremity of Prince Edward Island, dividing Northumberland Strait from the Gulf of St Lawrence proper.

Article

Cape St Mary

Cape St Mary forms the southern boundary of St Mary's Bay in an area of Nova Scotia's northwestern coast known as the French Shore. Fishing is the principal activity in this region; the cape was once the site of the International Tuna Cup matches.

Article

Cape St Mary's

Cape St Mary's, elevation 105 m, on Newfoundland's AVALON PENINSULA, is the steep and spectacular terminus of the land separating ST MARY'S BAY and PLACENTIA BAY near rich fishing grounds. The site of a lighthouse since 1860, the

Article

Cape Sable

Cape Sable is the southernmost point of land on CAPE SABLE ISLAND, which lies off the southwestern tip of Nova Scotia. It is composed of shifting sand dunes (French, sable) up to 9 m high and is nearly joined to the island by a sandy beach transversed by Hawk Channel.