Browse "Geographical features"

Displaying 341-360 of 457 results
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Qu'Appelle River

The Qu'Appelle River, 430 km long, rises in Lake Diefenbaker and meanders generally east across southern Saskatchewan, joining the Assiniboine River just east of the Manitoba border.

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Quadra Island

Quadra Island, BC, 270 km2, is situated at the North end of the Strait of Georgia between Vancouver Island and mainland BC, opposite Campbell River.

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Queen Elizabeth Islands

The Queen Elizabeth Islands, NWT/Nunavut, are a group of islands in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago lying north of a great bathometric trench composed of (east to west) Lancaster Sound, Barrow Strait, Viscount Melville Sound and M'Clure Strait.

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Quill Lakes

Quill Lakes, comprising 3 connected lakes – Big Quill (307 km2), Little Quill (181 km2), and Middle Quill (the smallest, known locally as Mud Lake), elevation 152 m – are located 150 km north of REGINA and 152 km east of SASKATOON.

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Rainy Lake

Rainy Lake, 932 km2 (741 km2 in Canada), elev 338 m, is located in rough woodlands astride the Ont-Minn border, 240 km W of Lk Superior. It discharges into the Rainy R, which flows W along the border to LK OF THE WOODS.

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Random Island

Random Island, NL, 249 km2 is the second largest island off the Island of Newfoundland (FOGO ISLAND is larger at 254 km2). Random Island runs 40 km east-west and 14 km north-south, and is situated in a deep western indentation of TRINITY BAY.

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Red Deer River

The Red Deer River (740 km, mean annual flow rate 62 m3/s), is glacier-fed by streams from Mount Drummond and Cyclone Mountain in the Rockies of Banff National Park in Alberta. It flows east then south to join the South SASKATCHEWAN RIVER just inside Saskatchewan.

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Red Lake

Red Lake, Ontario, incorporated as a municipality in 1998, population 4,107 (2016 census), 4,366 (2011 census). The municipality of Red Lake is located in northwestern Ontario on the shore of Red Lake, 555 km northwest of Thunder Bay. The municipality is the result of the amalgamation of the former townships of Red Lake (incorporated in 1960) and Golden (established in 1985), and the unorganized territory governed by the Madsen local services board. Red Lake consists of six communities (Madsen, Red Lake, Balmertown, Cochenour, McKenzie Island and Starratt-Olsen) that sprang up around the area's gold mines.

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Red River

The Red River (880 km long) begins at the confluence of the Bois de Sioux and Otter Tail rivers at the border between Minnesota and North Dakota. It then flows north through southern Manitoba and into Lake Winnipeg. The last 175 km of the Red River, the portion located in Manitoba, is designated as a Canadian Heritage River due to its cultural and historical value. The Red River flows through a productive agricultural region that is prone to both drought and severe flooding — the largest flood in the area in recent history, coined “the flood of the century,” occurred in 1997. The river’s basin was once the bottom of a glacial lake, Lake Agassiz, which covered the region 8,000 years ago. Currently, the Red River provides water for municipal, industrial and agricultural uses, and offers numerous summer and winter recreational opportunities, including boating, fishing (including ice fishing), camping and skating.

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Reindeer Lake

Reindeer Lake, 6650 km2, elev 337 m, max length 233 km, located on the border between northeastern Saskatchewan and northwestern Manitoba, is the second-largest lake in Saskatchewan and ninth largest in Canada. It has a heavily indented shoreline and contains numerous small islands.

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Restigouche River

Restigouche River (Ristigouche in Québec), 200 km long, rises in the highlands of northwestern New Brunswick as the Little Main Restigouche River.

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Rideau Lakes

Rideau Lakes, 65 km2, elev 123 m, mean depth 12.3 m, is a commonly used collective name for 3 lakes: Big Rideau, Upper Rideau and Lower Rideau.

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Rideau River

The Rideau River flows 100 km northwards from the Rideau Lakes in eastern Ontario to the Ottawa River at Ottawa.

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Rivière Chaudière

Rivière Chaudière, 193 km long and with a basin 6690 km2, is located in southern Québec. It is named after the waters that "boil" from its falls or after the numerous glacial erosion kettles (chaudière is French for boiler and also for bucket).