Arts & Culture | The Canadian Encyclopedia

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  • Article

    Toronto Feature: The Eaton Auditorium

    This article is from our Toronto Feature series. Features from past programs are not updated.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Toronto Feature: The Eaton Auditorium
  • Article

    Music in Toronto

    For much of Toronto’s early history, the dominant cultural force in the predominantly Protestant enclave was church music. By the beginning of the 20th century, Toronto was known as “the choral capital of North America.” By that time, the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra were well established. The city has also been an epicentre of piano building, music publishing, and the English-language recording and broadcasting industries. In addition to classical and choral music, Toronto has been a national centre for jazz artists, folk musicians, rock ‘n’ roll bands and R&B and hip hop artists. The city is home to the headquarters of many major record labels and cultural institutions, as well as some of the country’s oldest and best-known concert halls.

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  • Article

    Trinity College of Music, London

    Trinity College of Music, London. Established in 1872 to provide a comprehensive music education and, through its external examinations department, to examine and award certificates and diplomas (ATCL, LTCL, FTCL).

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Trinity College of Music, London
  • Article

    Music in Trois-Rivières

    Founded on the north shore of the St Lawrence River in 1634 by Sieur de Laviolette as a trading post. The town, located between Quebec city and Montreal derived its name from the three mouths of the St Maurice River, on which it is located.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Music in Trois-Rivières
  • Article

    Vancouver Art Gallery

    After the war, Vancouver's modernists, Lawren HARRIS among them, set the gallery on a new course.

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  • Article

    Music in Vancouver

    British Columbia metropolis: Canada's most important Pacific port and third largest city. Settled in 1862, Vancouver had several early names: Hastings Mills and Gastown (both 1867) and Granville (1870).

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Music in Vancouver
  • Editorial

    Vancouver Feature: Doors Open into an Exotic Cave

    The following article is a feature from our Vancouver Feature series. Past features are not updated. To find sophisticated entertainment in old Vancouver you had to go underground, into a grotto where stalactites hung from the ceiling and pirate’s gold shimmered in darkly lit corners. The Cave Supper Club hosted the world’s most famous entertainers and beautiful showgirls for 44 years. It was the rare place in subdued Vancouver to go out on a weekend evening for some risqué entertainment and exotic drinks.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Vancouver Feature: Doors Open into an Exotic Cave
  • Editorial

    Vancouver Feature: Little Tramp Graces the Orpheum Stage

    The following article is a feature from our Vancouver Feature series. Past features are not updated. When a troupe of English Music Hall entertainers swept through Vancouver in 1911, the star was an acrobatic little comedian who would soon become one of the most famous people in the world: Charlie Chaplin. Another player would carve his own niche in entertainment history, too. Arthur Stanley Jefferson became a beloved star after he changed his name to Stan Laurel and teamed up on film with Oliver Hardy.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Vancouver Feature: Little Tramp Graces the Orpheum Stage
  • Editorial

    Vancouver Feature: Marine Building Opens Amid Wall St. Woes

    The following article is a feature from our Vancouver Feature series. Past features are not updated. Vancouver had never seen anything like it, a skyscraping wedding cake animated with flying geese, swimming fish and hovering zeppelins. The Marine Building was — and still is — a masterpiece of Art Deco architecture, but it was a financial disaster from the day it swung open its magnificent gilded doors.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Vancouver Feature: Marine Building Opens Amid Wall St. Woes
  • Article

    Vancouver Playhouse Theatre Company

    The Vancouver Playhouse adopted the standard program pattern for regional theatres in Canada - a September to May season of about 6 plays that were mainly recent London and Broadway successes with a few classics included. From as early as 1966, every season featured at least one Canadian play.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/eba15386-f60d-4079-8bb2-d80bd5e87864.jpg Vancouver Playhouse Theatre Company
  • Article

    Music in Victoria

    Capital city of British Columbia. Established in 1843 on the southern tip of Vancouver Island as a Hudson's Bay Co trading post called Fort Victoria, the town had 148 adult inhabitants by 1855.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Music in Victoria
  • Article

    Victoria Conservatory of Music

    Victoria Conservatory of Music. Major British Columbia teaching institution, incorporated in 1964 as the Victoria School of Music. It adopted the name 'conservatory' in September of 1968 and was affiliated with the University of Victoria from October of that year until 1978.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Victoria Conservatory of Music
  • Article

    Village Historique de Val-Jalbert

    Village Historique de Val-Jalbert, Quebec, 5 km east of Roberval on the shores of Lac Saint-Jean. A ghost town and a very beautiful park, Val-Jalbert since 1960 has become a major attraction in the Saguenay-Lac Saint-Jean region.

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  • Article

    Walker Theatre

    Designed by Howard C. Stone of Montréal, the Walker was modelled on the famous Auditorium Theatre in Chicago (erected in 1889; designed by Adler and Sullivan) which is surrounded by a commercial complex.

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  • Article

    Western Manitoba Centennial Auditorium

    Western Manitoba Centennial Auditorium. Multi-purpose auditorium located next to the Queen Elizabeth II Music Building of Brandon University. The facility is operated by an incorporated board of governors appointed by the municipal and provincial governments.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Western Manitoba Centennial Auditorium