Sports & Recreation | The Canadian Encyclopedia

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  • List

    Trailblazing Black Canadian Athletes

    Athletic success, we’re told, takes grit and determination. With these strengths, an athlete can overcome any obstacle and, if they’re good enough, become the best in their sport, regardless of the challenges ahead of them. But what if the goalposts keep moving? What if the finish lines are drawn farther, the hurdles set higher, and the windows of opportunity sealed shut? The athletes in this exhibit were not only the best in their fields, but among the best in history. They were the fastest sprinters, the most agile skaters, the hardest hitters and, in many cases, the first to succeed at a high level. But though they earned the respect of their elite peers and the awestruck admiration of onlookers, there were barriers to their success — a colour bar blocking their way. Nevertheless, these courageous Black men and women persevered, and in so doing, cleared a path for future generations.

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  • Article

    Vancouver Asahi

    The Asahi was a Japanese Canadian baseball club in Vancouver (1914–42). One of the city’s most dominant amateur teams, the Asahi used skill and tactics to win multiple league titles in Vancouver and along the Northwest Coast. In 1942, the team was disbanded when its members were among the 22,000 Japanese Canadians who were interned by the federal government (see Internment of Japanese Canadians). The Asahi were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame in 2003 and the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame in 2005.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/Twitter_Cards/Asahi.jpg Vancouver Asahi
  • Editorial

    Vancouver Feature: Heavyweight Champ Battles Future Movie Star

    The following article is a feature from our Vancouver Feature series. Past features are not updated. In 1909, everyone knew who Jack Johnson was: the first Black Heavyweight Champion of the World. His opponent at the old Vancouver Athletic Club was a relatively unknown 26-year-old named Victor McLaglen. The young boxer lost this match, but would later win an Oscar and worldwide fame for his cinematic bouts with John Wayne.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Vancouver Feature: Heavyweight Champ Battles Future Movie Star
  • Article

    Vic Vogel

    Victor Stefan Vogel, pianist, conductor, composer, arranger, trombonist (born 3 August 1935 in Montreal, QC; died 16 September 2019 in Montreal). Vic Vogel was an icon of Montreal’s jazz scene. He emerged in the 1960s as a musician of considerable influence, bluster and colour. He moved freely between jazz, pop and, occasionally, symphony. He served as music director or accompanist for many CBC TV variety shows and was heard regularly on CBC Radio. He wrote or arranged music for ceremonies at Montreal’s Man and His World in 1968, the 1976 Olympic Summer Games in Montreal, the Canada Games in 1985, and the Grey Cup half-time shows in 1981 and 1985. He also performed at 35 editions of the Montreal International Jazz Festival — more than any other artist.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/3f2dcc41-c022-4384-9662-50736eafbd79.jpg Vic Vogel
  • Article

    Vicki Keith Munro

    Vicki Keith Munro (née Keith), marathon swimmer (born 26 February 1961 in Winnipeg, MB). Vicki Keith Munro is the most successful marathon swimmer in the history of the sport, currently holding an unprecedented 14 world records. Her marathon swimming career began in Kingston, Ont in August 1985 with her first world-record crossing of Lake Ontario (19.3 km in 11½ hours, butterfly stroke). In 1988, Keith Munro became the first person to cross all five Great Lakes.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/8bdbd818-705c-4144-91b0-00b99f3a309f.jpg Vicki Keith Munro
  • Article

    Vicky Sunohara

    Vicky Lynn Sunohara, hockey player, coach (born 18 May 1970 in Scarborough, ON). Vicky Sunohara was part of the first two Canadian Olympic women’s hockey teams to win gold, at the 2002 and the 2006 Olympic Winter Games. She also won a silver medal at the 1998 Olympic Winter Games, seven gold medals and one silver medal at the Women’s World Hockey Championships and a Canadian Women’s Hockey League Championship with the Brampton Thunder. In 164 games as a centre with the Canadian national women’s hockey team, Sunohara had 56 goals and 62 assists for 118 points. She has coached the University of Toronto’s women’s hockey team since 2011. She won coach of the year honours three years in a row between 2020 and 2023 and was named the OUA Female Coach of the Year across all sports in 2020. She was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in 2024.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/Bell_Olympic_Panel_Discussion_-_Vicky_Sunohara.jpg Vicky Sunohara
  • Article

    Victor Davis

    Victor Davis, CM, swimmer (born 10 February 1964 in Guelph, ON; died 13 November 1989 in Montréal, QC). Olympic and world champion Victor Davis won four medals at the Olympic Summer Games.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/6a5d801a-77b5-4178-88af-efbb7bba8693.jpg Victor Davis
  • Article

    Virgil Edwin Wagner

    Virgil Edwin Wagner, football player (born at Belleville, Ill 27 Feb 1922; died there 22 Aug 1997).

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Virgil Edwin Wagner
  • Article

    Walter Broda

    Walter Broda, "Turk," hockey player (b at Brandon, Man 15 May 1914; d at Toronto 17 Oct 1972). He was an outstanding goaltender with TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS 1936-52, winning the VÉZINA TROPHY in 1941 and 1948, and

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/b291c424-145b-4281-9565-27c664818540.jpg Walter Broda
  • Article

    Walter Ewing

    Walter Hamilton Ewing, trapshooter (born 11 February 1878 in Montréal, QC; died 25 June 1945 in Montréal). Ewing won the gold medal in individual trap shooting at the 1908 Olympic Games in London, England.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/eed52d79-9f98-4bd8-a417-d4730602b6b0.jpg Walter Ewing
  • Article

    Walter Knox

    Walter Knox, track and field athlete (b at Listowel, Ont 1878; d at St Petersburg, Fla 3 Mar 1951). Knox was one of the most versatile and successful performers in Canadian sport. From 1896 to 1933, he obtained 359 firsts, 90 seconds and 52 thirds in competition.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Walter Knox
  • Article

    Waneek Horn-Miller

    Waneek Horn-Miller, athlete, activist, broadcaster (born 30 November 1975 in Montreal, QC). Horn-Miller, a Mohawk from Kahnawake, Quebec, was co-captain of Canada’s first Olympic women’s water polo team and a gold medallist in water polo at the 1999 Pan American Games. She is a well-known activist for Indigenous rights and a prominent role model, mentor and advocate for youth involvement in sports. The Canadian Association for the Advancement of Women and Sport and Physical Activity named her one of the country’s most influential women in sport in 2015.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/d4d24d86-fc96-4266-be08-f9bb243defac.jpg Waneek Horn-Miller
  • Article

    Wayne Harris

    Carrol Wayne Harris, football player (b at Hampton, Ark 4 May 1938). Many regard Harris as the greatest ever to have played the position of centre linebacker in the CFL.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Wayne Harris
  • Macleans

    Weir Celebrates Masters Win

    IT WAS NEARLY MIDNIGHT when the post-Masters dinner finally broke up.This article was originally published in Maclean's Magazine on April 28, 2003

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Weir Celebrates Masters Win
  • Macleans

    What would Georges St-Pierre say?

    Behind many a successful celebrity is a ‘ghost tweeter,’ keeping him out of troubleThis article was originally published in Maclean's Magazine on July 15, 2013

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 What would Georges St-Pierre say?