Browse "Historic sites"

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Quidi Vidi Battery

The Quidi Vidi Battery was built in 1762 by the French. The French attacked the ST JOHN'S, Nfld, area in one of the last campaigns of the SEVEN YEARS' WAR, capturing and burning many settlements around Trinity and Conception bays. They then erected the battery to defend their newly won territory.

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Rebellion in Lower Canada (The Patriots' War)

In 1837 and 1838, French Canadian militants in Lower Canada took up arms against the British Crown in a pair of insurrections. The twin rebellions killed more than 300 people. They followed years of tensions between the colony’s anglophone minority and the growing, nationalistic aspirations of its francophone majority. The rebels failed in their campaign against British rule. However, their revolt led to political reform, including the unified Province of Canada and the introduction of responsible government. The rebellion in Lower Canada, which is also known as the Patriots' War (la Guerre des patriotes), also gave French Canadians one of their first nationalist heroes in Louis-Joseph Papineau.

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Rebellion in Upper Canada

The 1837 rebellion in Upper Canada was a less violent, more limited affair than the uprising earlier that year in Lower Canada. However, its leaders, including William Lyon Mackenzie, were equally serious in their demands. They wanted democratic reform and an end to the rule of a privileged oligarchy. The rebellion itself failed, but its very failure helped pave the way for moderate and careful political change in British North America. This included the union of Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada and the eventual introduction of responsible government.

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Red Bay Archaeological Site

Red Bay, located on the north shore of the Strait of Belle Isle, Labrador, is an archaeological reference for the 16th-century transatlantic fishery, particularly for Basque whaling activities. After research into Spanish documents and archaeological finds on Saddle Island and under water, Red Bay was designated a historical site in 1978-79. In 2013, the whaling station at Red Bay was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Red River Resistance

The Red River Resistance (also known as the Red River Rebellion) was an uprising in 1869–70 in the Red River Colony. The resistance was sparked by the transfer of the vast territory of Rupert’s Land to the new Dominion of Canada. The colony of farmers and hunters, many of them Métis, occupied a corner of Rupert’s Land and feared for their culture and land rights under Canadian control. The Métis mounted a resistance and declared a provisional government to negotiate terms for entering Confederation. The uprising led to the creation of the province of Manitoba, and the emergence of Métis leader Louis Riel — a hero to his people and many in Quebec, but an outlaw in the eyes of the Canadian government.

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Ross Farm

Ross Farm, at New Ross, NS, 28 km north of Chester, dates from 1816, when Captain William Ross led 172 disbanded soldiers into the Nova Scotia interior to establish an agricultural settlement.

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Ross-Thomson House

The Ross-Thomson House is located in SHELBURNE, NS. At the end of the American Revolution, thousands of LOYALISTS arrived in Shelburne. Many quickly left, but others, like George and Robert Ross, settled and began businesses in the new town.

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Rutherford House

Rutherford House is an elegant Edwardian house built in 1909 for Alexander Cameron RUTHERFORD, the first premier of Alberta and chancellor of the UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA (1927-41).

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Shand House

Shand House in WINDSOR, NS, is an ornate Victorian residence built by Clifford and Henrie Shand in 1890 as a family home. Clifford Shand was a noted bicycle racer and the son of a Windsor furniture manufacturer, and the interior of the house reflects this association with fine woodworking.

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Sherbrooke Village

Sherbrooke Village in Sherbrooke, NS, is unusual in that it is not a collection of historic buildings moved into a reconstructed townsite, but rather the older portion of the actual village of Sherbrooke.