Browse "Historic sites"

Displaying 121-140 of 209 results
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Lawrence House Museum

The Lawrence House Museum in Maitland, NS, is both a national and a provincial HISTORIC SITE. It was built in about 1870 by the noted shipbuilder, William Lawrence, as a family home.

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Leitch Collieries

Leitch Collieries, an Alberta provincial HISTORIC SITE, is located near the entrance to the municipality of CROWSNEST PASS. This mine site is now abandoned, but in 1907, when it opened, it was considered one of the most advanced and up-to-date coal and coke operations in Canada.

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Library of Parliament

The Library of Parliament came into being when the legislative libraries of Upper and Lower Canada were amalgamated in 1841 and situated in Montréal. In 1849 only 200 of the 12,000 books were saved when an angry mob protesting the Rebellion Losses Bill set fire to the Parliament Buildings.

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Louisbourg

In the 18th century, Louisbourg was a fortified town and an important strategic capital in the French colony of Île Royale (Cape Breton Island). It was the scene of two major military sieges in the Anglo-French wars for supremacy in North America. The fall of Louisbourg to the British in 1758 paved the way for the capture of Québec and the end of French rule in North America. Today, Louisbourg is a national historic site and a popular tourist destination in Cape Breton.

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Lower Fort Garry

Lower Fort Garry was built 30 km down the Red River from Fort Garry [Winnipeg] during the 1830s as the Hudson's Bay Company's administrative centre for Rupert's Land. Although it never achieved the status originally intended, Lower Fort Garry served in a number of minor roles.

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Maison Saint-Gabriel

Maison Saint-Gabriel is a museum and historic site that openedin 1966. This 300-year-old building, located in Montréal’s Pointe-Sainte-Charles district, is one of the finest examples of the traditional architecture of New France.

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Martello Tower

The 16 squat, flat-roofed towers built in British North America from 1796 to 1848 were distributed as follows: Halifax (5), Saint John (1), Québec City (4) and Kingston (6). The towers were built during times of tension with the United States.

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McCulloch House

McCulloch House in PICTOU, NS, was built in about 1806 for Thomas MCCULLOCH, one of the Maritimes' leading educators and a theologian, writer and scholar of note. McCulloch arrived in Pictou in 1803 on his way to Prince Edward Island.

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Montgomery's Tavern

Montgomery’s Tavern was a focal point in the Rebellion of Upper Canada in 1837. Owner John Montgomery sympathized with the Reform movement but not the actual rebellion. His tavern served as the headquarters for William Lyon Mackenzie — culminating in a skirmish there between local rebels and government militia. The location in Toronto today, at Yonge Street and Montgomery Avenue, is a national historic site.