Browse "Transportation"

Article

Raft

Once the spring timber drive reached the main rivers, the timber was assembled into rafts for transportation to the shipping port.

Article

Rail

Rail is the common name for some members of the rail family (Rallidae) of birds.

Article

Railway Safety

One of the most famous railway accidents in recent years was the 1979 "Mississauga Derailment". There were no injuries, but the accident involved leaking chlorine cars and forced the evacuation of 250 000 nearby residents.

Article

Roads and Highways

Canada's first highways were the rivers and lakes used by Indigenous people, travelling by canoe in summer and following the frozen waterways in winter. The water network was so practical that explorers, settlers and soldiers followed the example of the Indigenous peoples.

Article

Sailing Ships

In Canada's age of sail (1800-75) over 4000 ships, each exceeding 500 tons burthen, were built in Canada. In 1878 Canadian-registered ships numbered 7196 and totalled 1 333 015 tons. Among the nations, Canada stood fourth in seagoing tonnage.

Article

Samson

Samson, first locomotive in North America to burn coal and the first to run over all-iron rails. Built in New Shildon, England, it was shipped to Pictou, NS, to haul coal from the Albion Mines 9.6 km over a tramway to Dunbar Point on Pictou Harbour.

Article

Silver Dart

J.A.D. MCCURDY was the principal designer and pilot; Glenn H. Curtiss developed the water-cooled engine, an advance on the association's earlier experiments.

Article

Snowmobile

Most innovations in transportation have been adapted to recreation, eg, the bicycle, boat and car, and widespread use of the snowmobile was a logical development in Canada. Over snow-covered ground it provides transportation previously impossible except on skis, snowshoes or dogsled.

Article

Soaring

Soaring, or gliding, is the sport of flying a sailplane or glider for a sustained period of time by utilizing currents of rising air to stay aloft.

Article

Steamboats and Paddle Wheelers

Demonstrated in France on the Saône River in 1783, the paddle-wheel steamboat first appeared in North America for use on the Delaware River in 1787. After inauguration at New Orleans in 1811 by Robert Fulton, hundreds of boats worked the Mississippi River system between 1830 and 1870.

Article

Submersible

The Canadian government took delivery of a HYSUB 5000 ROV in 1987. Designed and manufactured by International Submarine Engineering (ISE) of Port Moody, BC, the HYSUB is an electrohydraulic submersible remotely operated vehicle, operating with 6 to 250 hp.

Article

Tonquin

The Tonquin was a ship of 269 tons built in New York in 1807 and purchased 23 August 1810 by New York fur merchant and entrepreneur John Jacob Astor.

Article

Toronto Subway

The Toronto subway is part of a larger public transportation network, including streetcars, buses and light rapid transit, run by the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC). It opened on 30 March 1954, making it Canada’s first subway. Since then, it has grown from a single, 12-station line running 7.4 km beneath Yonge Street to a four-line system encompassing 75 stations over 76.9 km. In 2016, more than 221 million people rode the Toronto subway.

Article

Trans-Canada Airlines

 Trans-Canada Airlines was created 10 April 1937 by Act of Parliament as a subsidiary of CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS to provide air service to all regions of Canada. TCA began with 2 passenger aircraft and a small bi-plane, which was used to survey new routes.