Historic sites | The Canadian Encyclopedia

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  • Article

    Fort William

    Named in 1807 after NWC chief superintendent William MCGILLIVRAY, Fort William occupied a pivotal place in the company's vast trading network. In 1816-17 Lord SELKIRK occupied Fort William for 10 months as a consequence of the SEVEN OAKS INCIDENT.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/7b13aa86-dd8f-4056-b650-3839e00b77e9.jpg Fort William
  • Article

    Fort York National Historic Site

    The Fort York National Historic Site commemorates several British military installations which guarded the entrance to Toronto Harbour.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/a55f0fd3-041e-4936-ac4d-11d232bbdf0e.jpg Fort York National Historic Site
  • Article

    Fraser River Gold Rush

    In 1858, around 30,000 gold seekers flooded the banks of the Fraser River from Hope to just north of Lillooet in British Columbia’s first significant gold rush. Although it dissipated by the mid-1860s, the Fraser River Gold Rush had a significant impact on the area’s Indigenous peoples and resulted in the Fraser Canyon War. Fears that the massive influx of American miners would lead the United States to annex the non-sovereign British territory known as New Caledonia also resulted in the founding of British Columbia as a colony on 2 August 1858 (see The Fraser River Gold Rush and the Founding of British Columbia). By the mid-1860s, the Fraser Rush collapsed, and British Columbia sank into a recession.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/new_article_images/FraserCanyonWar/Fraser Canyon near Chapmans Bar, Daniel Marshall(1).jpg Fraser River Gold Rush
  • Article

    Gastown

    Gastown is a retail and commercial district in Vancouver, British Columbia. It is bounded by Cordova Street and the waterfront between Richards Street and Main Street. The original Gastown settlement formed the nucleus for the City of Vancouver and is now a National Historic Site. Today, Gastown is a popular tourist destination and home to restaurants, gift shops, boutiques, galleries, nightclubs and bars. It is also part of the Downtown Eastside, Vancouver’s lowest-income neighbourhood, and the location of single resident occupancy hotels, social housing and social services.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/de041c94-dd8a-4af8-8def-f3bc4cc26777.jpg Gastown
  • Article

    Gray Burial Site

    Gray Burial Site, north of Swift Current, Sask, lies on a sandy hillside west of an ancient glacial outwash channel.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Gray Burial Site
  • Article

    Haliburton House

    Haliburton House, a 1½ storey villa in WINDSOR, NS, was built in 1836 and originally set in a 16 ha estate. It was the home of Thomas Chandler HALIBURTON, one of Nova Scotia's most famous 19th-century figures.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Haliburton House
  • Article

    Halifax Citadel

    The general introduction of rifled artillery (with greater range and accuracy than earlier guns) shortly after completion of the Citadel rendered the costly installation obsolescent. It was partially rearmed in the 1860s and 1870s, and continued in use as a barracks into the 20th century.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/2a4ab68a-776a-430a-9155-c6d6ae17697b.jpg Halifax Citadel
  • Article

    HBC Trading Posts in Canada

    From 1670 until 1987, the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) operated hundreds of trading posts in various parts of Canada and the northwestern US. During the fur trade, Indigenous trappers visited trading posts to exchange furs for valued goods produced by Europeans, including metal objects, weapons and glass beads. In 1870, the HBC’s vast territory of northern wilderness (see Rupert’s Land and North-Western Territories) was transferred to the Canadian government, and the HBC gradually transitioned from a fur trading company to a retail establishment. The HBC maintained posts in Northern Canada, however, until 1987. Some settlements that remained in and around the old trading posts developed into cities, such as Winnipeg (Fort Garry), Edmonton (Fort Edmonton) and Victoria (Fort Victoria). Some First Nations that had established themselves near HBC posts also have names that reflect their fur trading history, including Fort Albany First Nation in Ontario and Fort McKay First Nation in Alberta.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/Kugluktuk-Trading-Post.jpg HBC Trading Posts in Canada
  • Article

    Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump

    Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump is an archaeological site located on the southern end of the Porcupine Hills in southwest Alberta.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/044efca3-4d40-4efa-b5ae-4f9f20403ea4.jpeg Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump
  • Article

    Heart's Content Cable Station

    Hearts Content Cable Station is a provincial HISTORIC SITE commemorating one of the most significant events in the 19th century: the laying of a trans-Atlantic TELEGRAPH cable in 1866 from Ireland to HEART'S CONTENT, NL.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Heart's Content Cable Station
  • Article

    Hebron Mission National Historic Site of Canada

    For generations, Hebron, one of Nunatsiavut’s (see Labrador Inuit and Newfoundland and Labrador) most culturally important and significant sites, was an important meeting place for the Inuit, as well as a primary hunting and fishing area. In the early 1800s, Moravian missionaries chose the site to establish their fourth and northernmost mission in Labrador, officially opening the mission in 1830 (although missions were later established farther north, at Ramah in 1871 and Killinek in 1905). For more than 130 years, Hebron was a thriving community where an average of 200 to 250 Inuit lived. In 1959, without consultation with the Inuit, the community was closed, forcing all Inuit to relocate. Declared a National Historic Site in 1976 by the federal government, the Hebron Mission has been undergoing major restoration since 2004.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/new_article_images/HebronMissionNationalHistoricSiteofCanada/Hebron_Mission_1901_photo.png Hebron Mission National Historic Site of Canada
  • Collection

    Heritage Minutes

    The Heritage Minutes collection is a bilingual series of history-focused public service announcements. Each 60-second short film depicts a significant person, event or story in Canadian history. They are produced by Historica Canada, the not-for-profit organization that also publishes this encyclopedia. First released in 1991, the Heritage Minutes have been shown on television, in cinemas and online. They have become a recognizable part of Canadian culture. The collection currently includes 100 episodes.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/1bfa3d45-2952-4f79-b7d4-4c6cb6601164.jpg Heritage Minutes
  • Article

    Heritage Trail

    Hundreds of trails are now found from coast to coast in Canada, installed and run by national and provincial parks, the Canadian Wildlife Service, tourist departments, conservation authorities, museums, universities, schools, botanical gardens and private agencies.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Heritage Trail
  • Article

    Historic Dunvegan

    One of the most important fur trade sites on the PEACE RIVER, a post operated at Dunvegan from 1805 to 1918. The first post was built by Archibald Norman McLeod of the North West Company to trade with the BEAVER and other First Nations who lived in the middle and upper reaches of the Peace River.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/1b7019ae-3e5d-4d8a-9491-35e2fb72ca9a.jpg Historic Dunvegan
  • Article

    Historic Sites in Canada

    Historic sites are places that are recognized for their importance in Canadian history. Provincial or territorial historic sites are designated by provincial and territorial governments, while national historic sites are designated by the federal government. At the federal level, the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada also designates people and events of national significance, in addition to sites. These people and events are often commemorated by a plaque at a physical place. Municipalities also often have the authority to designate historic sites of local significance, as do Indigenous organizations under self-government agreements. Finally, historic sites may be designated at more than one level (e.g., provincial and national). (See also National Historic Sites in Canada; UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Canada).

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/new_article_images/WritingOnStoneProvincialPark/48208326871_e9ef42fa43_h.jpg Historic Sites in Canada