Browse "Rivers"

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Milk River

WRITING-ON-STONE PROVINCIAL PARK and a natural area in Alberta protect parts of the river's remarkable landscapes. The American explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark gave the Milk River its name (in 1805) because its colour reminded them of a cup of tea mixed with milk.

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Moose River

The Moose River is 547 km long from the head of its tributary, the Mattagami River. It is formed by the confluence of the Mattagami and the Missinaibi rivers, and flows northeast 104 km to discharge into the bottom of James Bay in northern Ontario.

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Nass River

Nass River is 380 km long, rises in the northern interior of BC and flows generally southwest, draining approximately 20 700 km2, to reach the Pacific at Portland Inlet. Its major tributaries are the Bell-Irving, Meziadin and Cranberry rivers.

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Nechako River

The Nechako River rises in the Coast Mountains in west-central BC and flows east to form a principal tributary of the Fraser River. Because of massive damming of its headwaters, it is no longer possible to give its length or tell exactly where it used to rise.

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Nelson River

The Nelson River, 2,575 km long, flows north northeast out of Playgreen Lake, at the northwest tip of Lake Winnipeg. It spills out into a number of lakes, including Cross, Sipiwesk, Split and Stevens, flowing east from the latter into Hudson Bay.

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North Saskatchewan River

​The North Saskatchewan River (1,287 km long, the first 48.5 km of which is designated as a Canadian Heritage River) is a major tributary to the Saskatchewan River, which ultimately flows into Hudson Bay. The mean annual flow is 241 m3/s; however, flow varies between the peak in July and minimum in February. It served as a major transportation route from the end of the last Ice Age through the mid-20th century.

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Oldman River

​The Oldman River is a heavily regulated river flowing through the arid, agricultural region of southwestern Alberta.

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Qu'Appelle River

The Qu'Appelle River, 430 km long, rises in Lake Diefenbaker and meanders generally east across southern Saskatchewan, joining the Assiniboine River just east of the Manitoba border.

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Red Deer River

The Red Deer River (740 km, mean annual flow rate 62 m3/s), is glacier-fed by streams from Mount Drummond and Cyclone Mountain in the Rockies of Banff National Park in Alberta. It flows east then south to join the South SASKATCHEWAN RIVER just inside Saskatchewan.

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Red River

The Red River (880 km long) begins at the confluence of the Bois de Sioux and Otter Tail rivers at the border between Minnesota and North Dakota. It then flows north through southern Manitoba and into Lake Winnipeg. The last 175 km of the Red River, the portion located in Manitoba, is designated as a Canadian Heritage River due to its cultural and historical value. The Red River flows through a productive agricultural region that is prone to both drought and severe flooding — the largest flood in the area in recent history, coined “the flood of the century,” occurred in 1997. The river’s basin was once the bottom of a glacial lake, Lake Agassiz, which covered the region 8,000 years ago. Currently, the Red River provides water for municipal, industrial and agricultural uses, and offers numerous summer and winter recreational opportunities, including boating, fishing (including ice fishing), camping and skating.

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Restigouche River

Restigouche River (Ristigouche in Québec), 200 km long, rises in the highlands of northwestern New Brunswick as the Little Main Restigouche River.

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Rideau River

The Rideau River flows 100 km northwards from the Rideau Lakes in eastern Ontario to the Ottawa River at Ottawa.

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Rivière Chaudière

Rivière Chaudière, 193 km long and with a basin 6690 km2, is located in southern Québec. It is named after the waters that "boil" from its falls or after the numerous glacial erosion kettles (chaudière is French for boiler and also for bucket).

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Rivière Dumoine

The Dumoine, 129 km long, rises in Lac Dumoine in southwest Québec and flows off the south edge of the Laurentian Highlands through a series of waterfalls, wild rapids and long chutes into the Ottawa River.