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  • Article

    Battle of Crysler's Farm National Historic Site of Canada

    Before a national program of designating historic places was developed, the Government of Canada erected a monument commemorating the Battle of Crysler's Farm on the battlefield in 1895.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/7b2eb773-c251-420c-a574-4ca7212f66db.jpg Battle of Crysler's Farm National Historic Site of Canada
  • Article

    Battle of Lundy's Lane National Historic Site of Canada

    Battle of Lundy's Lane National Historic Site marks the 25 July 1814 Battle of Lundy's Lane, the fiercest and bloodiest land action during the War of 1812.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Battle of Lundy's Lane National Historic Site of Canada
  • Article

    Canada and the Battle of Passchendaele

    The Battle of Passchendaele, also known as the Third Battle of Ypres, was fought during the First World War from 31 July to 10 November 1917. The battle took place on the Ypres salient on the Western Front, in Belgium, where German and Allied armies had been deadlocked for three years. On 31 July, the British began a new offensive, attempting to break through German lines by capturing a ridge near the ruined village of Passchendaele. After British, Australian and New Zealand troops launched failed assaults, the Canadian Corps joined the battle on 26 October. The Canadians captured the ridge on 6 November, despite heavy rain and shelling that turned the battlefield into a quagmire. Nearly 16,000 Canadians were killed or wounded. The Battle of Passchendaele did nothing to help the Allied effort and became a symbol of the senseless slaughter of the First World War.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/a91703c5-8a80-4e21-8ba2-c6fabc0343b4.jpg Canada and the Battle of Passchendaele
  • Article

    Battle of Queenston Heights National Historic Site of Canada

    The Battle of Queenston Heights National Historic Site commemorates a battle fought on 13 October 1812, when the British army and Canadian militia, assisted by First Nations allies, defeated an invading American army on the Niagara Escarpment overlooking the village of Queenston.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/d60240b0-5df1-48c0-bd0f-e3c0fbc67705.jpg Battle of Queenston Heights National Historic Site of Canada
  • Article

    Battle of Stoney Creek National Historic Site of Canada

    Stoney Creek National Historic Site commemorates a British victory over American forces at the Battle of Stoney Creek fought on 6 June 1813 in the settlement of Stoney Creek, now part of the city of Hamilton.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/cd94fe20-51df-49eb-ad0a-8333778ae2e8.jpg Battle of Stoney Creek National Historic Site of Canada
  • Article

    Battle of the Châteauguay National Historic Site of Canada

    The Battle of the Châteauguay National Historic Site commemorates the Battle of Châteauguay, a battle in the War of 1812 that took place on 26 October 1813.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/5f9964d3-d547-4911-8a4b-2d4a5414bf75.jpg Battle of the Châteauguay National Historic Site of Canada
  • Article

    Battle of the Plains of Abraham

    The Battle of the Plains of Abraham (13 September 1759), also known as the Battle of Quebec, was a pivotal moment in the Seven Years’ War and in the history of Canada. A British invasion force led by General James Wolfe defeated French troops under the Marquis de Montcalm, leading to the surrender of Quebec to the British. Both commanding officers died from wounds sustained during the battle. The French never recaptured Quebec and effectively lost control of New France in 1760. At the end of the war in 1763 France surrendered many of its colonial possessions — including Canada — to the British. (This is the full-length entry about the Battle of the Plains of Abraham. For a plain-language summary, please see Battle of the Plains of Abraham (Plain-Language Summary).)

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/ea7e8555-9481-4ebb-9585-dc9a4abd22d8.jpg Battle of the Plains of Abraham
  • Article

    Battle of the Plains of Abraham (Plain-Language Summary)

    The Battle of the Plains of Abraham took place on 13 September 1759. The Plains of Abraham are in Quebec City. It was fought between the French and their Indigenous allies against the British. The British won. Losing the battle was a major defeat for the French. Soon after, France lost all of Quebec. In 1763, France gave all of Canada to Britain. The era of New France was over. Until Confederation in 1867, Britain would control the colonies that became Canada. (See Confederation (Plain-Language Summary).) (This article is a plain-language summary of the Battle of the Plains of Abraham. If you are interested in reading about this topic in more depth, please see our full-length entry, Battle of the Plains of Abraham.)

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/Taking_of_Quebec.jpg Battle of the Plains of Abraham (Plain-Language Summary)
  • Article

    Canada and the Second Battle of Ypres

    The Second Battle of Ypres was fought during the First World War from 22 April to 25 May 1915. It was the first major battle fought by Canadian troops in the Great War. The battle took place on the Ypres salient on the Western Front, in Belgium, outside the city of Ypres (now known by its Flemish name, Ieper). The untested Canadians distinguished themselves as a determined fighting force, resisting the horror of the first large-scale poison gas attack in modern history. Canadian troops held a strategically critical section of the frontline until reinforcements could be brought in. More than 6,500 Canadians were killed, wounded or captured in the Second Battle of Ypres.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/new_article_images/ypres/a022718.jpg Canada and the Second Battle of Ypres
  • Article

    Battleford

    In 1905 a rail line finally reached the area, but the Canadian Northern Railway had chosen to bypass Battleford, an event that eventually led to the creation of the adjacent community of North Battleford.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Battleford
  • Article

    Bay

    A bay is a body of water partly surrounded by land and connected to a larger body of water. It is typically bigger than a cove and smaller than a gulf. However, this is not always the case. For example, Hudson Bay is much larger than the Persian Gulf. Strictly speaking and by international agreement, to be defined as a bay, a water body’s mouth (the boundary between itself and the larger body of water to which it is connected) must not exceed 24 nautical miles. In addition, its area must exceed that of a semicircle drawn with the mouth as its diameter.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/new_article_images/Bay/HudsonBay.jpg Bay
  • Article

    Bay d'Espoir

    Bay d'Espoir is a fjord-like arm of Hermitage Bay on Newfoundland’s south coast. More than 50 km from mouth to head, Bay d'Espoir — French for “hope” — is ice-free, with sheer cliffs and steep-sided hills rising 180 to 300 m. The bay divides into two principal arms to the north and northeast of Bois Island. Because of the tremendous watershed from a surrounding glacial plateau, the area is the site of a hydroelectric generating plant. Opened in 1967, today the plant has a generating capacity of more than 600 MW.

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  • Article

    Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine

    Between about 15 000 and 10 000 years ago, as the glaciers retreated from the last ice age, parts of Georges Bank and other shallow areas were dry land; fragments of trees and mammoth teeth from this era are still found occasionally in fishing trawls.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/4bc5b21a-e673-4f22-9e76-db46b45d42b6.jpg Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine
  • Article

    Beaconsfield

    Beaconsfield is a reference to Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Count of Beaconsfield (1804-80), Queen Victoria's favourite prime minister.

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    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/images/tce_placeholder.jpg?v=e9dca980c9bdb3aa11e832e7ea94f5d9 Beaconsfield
  • Article

    Beauceville

    The history of the Beauceville area goes back to 1737 when the Seigneury Rigaud de Vaudreuil, or Saint-François-de-la-Nouvelle-Beauce, was granted to François-Pierre de Rigaud de Vaudreuil (1703-79). The name Nouvelle-Beauce refers to the Beauce Region of France, famous for its wheat production.

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    https://d3d0lqu00lnqvz.cloudfront.net/media/media/7b1fbfc5-838e-4908-863d-6d3093349fdf.jpg Beauceville